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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
economic soundness to this country. that take as big deal. a lot of pain. democrats are upset the president talked about pain on their side of the ail and republicans are saying no way will we give tax relief to middle income americans. they want to continue tax relief to the wealthy. everyone agrees a number around $4 trillion will make a serious debt on our deficit. it will send a statement to the world that the u.s. has gotten ahold of their fiscal problems and they are moving forward. it will give confidence to the american people that we can move forward to bring economic soundness. that's the president's commitment. >> 6:00 on the east coast. welcome to "morning joe." look at that nice live look at times square. joe is looking spify today. he went shopping. it is monday, july 11th. >> i don't know what that means. >> we have msnbc -- well, yes. this is unusual. we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle, john heilemann. what's so funny? >> yeah, what's so funny? i don't get it. he's back. >> we can't get him to leave. we have "morning joe" economic analyst steve rattner and in washington
! why is he introducing it? >> i think the president is acting in good faith. i think he wants a big deal. i think he will take cuts that contracts won't want and take taxes. because his presidency and the future of the country -- he believes -- [everyone talking at once] >> socialistic. that what you're saying. >> vaguely socialistic, yes. >> when they came out with the report he said -- >> what is that report? >> that's a report that deals with the long-term deficit problems of this country. >> they recommend taxation, do they not. >> they had a whole series of recommendations, and the president said i will stand by what they did, except they're still waiting for him to stand by them. >> he's never taken it seriously, in not in his budget, not in his budget state, know when bowl simpson came city. not when they wanted a clean debt limit increase. so that he is winning a debate over the fiscal future of the country is astonishing! and. >> but he's keeping something else off page one! what is it? >> this is a genuine. >> the unemployment problem? it doesn't even figure in this. >> co
the three folksy just heard from. marty, you know as a community school, educational. he is a big deal. but when he goes of his out that big a deal. his wife is a powerhouse. their daughter, molly, is an up-and-coming an already excellent film maker. i mean, to be friends with marty is like winning the trifecta, frankly. marty, you are lucky man as well as a special friend. now josh kaufman has been a personal friend and our attorney for 30 years, a founding member of the board. he has -- he has gotten me out of trouble more than once, but i think more important that he has kept me from getting into trouble which is actually more important. the most recent, he stole our footage of the disgraceful documentary. anyway, i hope we will be friends for another 30 years. you look like to make it. i don't know if i will. a leader. c.s. tear us through some incredibly tough times. seats recoveries were here when our founding chairman -- sorry. lost a battle with cancer. then, of course, she inherited the job just as the worst. he had been just terrific. that is what to say a couple of words abo
forward. >>> big news this morning. first according to several reports the sexual assault case against dominique strauss-kahn is falling apart because his accuser may not be telling the truth. strauss-kahn has a bail hearing later today. cbs news correspondent elaine quijano is at the courthouse in manhattan with the latest. >> reporter: good morning to you. if true these new developments represent a stunning reversal of fortune for the man whose political and financial career all but disintegrated when he was arrested six weeks ago. two law enforcement officials told "the times" the case against dominique strauss-kahn could soon collapse because they have uncovered major holes in the credibility of the housekeeper who filed the charges. >> this defendant is charged with criminal sexual acts in the first degree. >> reporter: the woman charged that strauss-kahn assaulted her and forced her to commit a sex act when he came upon her while she was cleaning his $3,000 a night suite at new york's sofitel hotel. forensic evidence confirms a sexual encounter between the two took place but pros
dramatic world cup finals, ever. japan's big win, now, giving that nation new hope. >>> and super dog. crime fighter caught on camera. how he took a bite out of crime. he's here live this morning. >>> good morning, everyone. seeing poco, i have a craving for taco bell. george is off today. josh is right here by my side. oh, that game. >> this close. this close, twice. of course, the u.s. women falling in stunning fashion to japan in the world cup final yesterday and we saw the agony of defeat. but we have to remember, we have seen the thrill of victory, twice before. i think something that occurred to me yesterday, what we saw yesterday was the thrill of defeat. if you could watch that game yesterday and go back to the ticket booth and say i want my money back, that wasn't enough for me, you got a very high bar for drama and excitement and entertainment >> debra roberts is there. we'll have a live report from her in just a little moment. >>> thankfully the temperatures aren't as bad there as they are here. >>> off the florida coast, take a look at what's forming this morning. tropical
have a big hole to fill. each new job, that was created last month is good news for the people who are back at work. and for the families that they take care of. and for the communities that they are a part of. but, our economy as a whole just isn't producing nearly enough jobs for everybody who's looking. we have always known that we'd have ups and downs on the way back from this recession. over the past few months the economy has experienced some tough headwinds from the natural disasters to spikes in gas prices to state and local budget cuts that have cost tens of thousands of cops and firefighters and teachers their jobs. the problems in greece and in europe along with uncertainty over whether the debt limit here in the united states will be raised have also made businesses hesitant to invest more aggressively. the economic challenges we face were not created overnight, and they are not going to be solved overnight. but the american people expect us to act on every single good idea that is out there. i read letter after letter from folks hit hard from this economy, and none of
for the tabloids. host: what about the broadsheets? guest: it is known occasionally. there was a big scandal about mp's expenses last year, which came from information that is the voice of -- information that is the will serve and got on a computer disk. my newspaper paid for that because they thought it was in the public interest. that is a rare instance of a broadsheet paper paying for information. for the tabloids, we call it checkbook journalism. salacious information about a night out on the town with a celebrity or pop star or encounters with celebrities. that culture has grown and become more insidious over the past 20 or 30 years. host: how would you describe, to help put it in perspective -- by the way, we will put the numbers on the screen as we continue this conversation about the phone hacking investigation in the u.k. prime minister cameron spoke this morning at a problem about it and we carry that live on c- span -- spoke this morning in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you
it. and that in a nutshell is why a lot of big, moderate players in this town led by president obama do like this bipartisan scheme. with 13 days until possible default, all eyes are on the gang of six senators, three republicans and three democrats. they met today with house democrats. can they craft a deficit deal that can pass congress? lawmakers ask gang of six democrat kent conrad. >> how does this work? where is it headed? >> reporter: like the deficit commission, like president obama, the gang of six has a plan that's balanced. gang of six democrat dick durbin. >> it does it by putting everything on the table. everything. spending cuts, entitlement programs and revenue. >> reporter: $3 trillion in spending cuts, including cuts in medicare and the like. $1 trillion in tax hikes. but not on most americans. >> we're actually reducing tax rates, both on the individual side and the corporate side. >> reporter: that's a move to win over conservatives, like house gop leader eric cantor. >> and so i don't think that raising taxes, increasing tax rates, is the answer. certainly not in
. the key sticking point is this issue of raising the debt limit, large enough, big enough, so that it gets us through 2012, gets us into the spring of 2013. right now, of course, the boehner bill and what republicans were supporting would have this debt limit come to another vote in the next -- >> at this point in time -- >> harry reid wants to do is simply figure out a way to satisfy the second round of deficit reduction, create a stronger trigger potentially, whatever he can come to, to get more republicans to support his way in order to get this debt limit passed 2012. i think he's going to come to an agreement. the question is, how big of an agreement is it? is it an agreement that barely gets the eight republicans he wants? or does it get 20 republicans and sends a strong, bipartisan message to make sure this thing doesn't get gummed up again in the house. >> does he have a dance partner in terms of a republican willing to negotiate? >> reporter: he's got a few dance partners potentially, but right now he's not working very well with mitch mcconnell. that's not clear. but don't be sur
that she is not telling the truth. so we don't know exactly what is going on here. but it is a big deal for them to be questioning the integrity of their own witness. >> jack, what do you expect the court is deciding today regarding bail and movement of strauss-kahn? >> it's interesting because it's not unusual to go back to a judge during the course of a case and ask for changes to be made in bail. but as those changes are usually requested by the prosecution when they say they have more information and more bad stuff on this guy and we want you to to jack this up. for the judge to change this maybe off the record or on the record but it strongly suggests there are serious problems here and that even the prosecution is backing away from him at this point. >> jack ford, thank you so much. >> thank you. >>> president obama heads to camp david today for the fourth of july weekend. after turning down senate majority leader offer to meet with republicans over the budget stalemate. bill plante has the latest on the negotiations this morning. bill, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to y
and virginia is the big exception to this because they are the ones as john pointed out that established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these stasis constitutions and i don't have a political ax to grind, but it fascinates me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious christian, if not protestant qualifications for holding office so you have pennsylvania, for example, the most radical democratic constitution of them all, and in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the devine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 # -- 1776 constitution of the independence of vermont, now this bashing of liberalism, upholds the idea all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of the devine old and new testaments, obey the sabbath, and be a protestant, catholics, jews, forget about it. they can't serve in government. it's referred to as a federalist argument; right? at what -- did the constitution leave religion out beca
for educational leadership and he's a big deal. but when he goes home, he's not that big of a deal. his wife helen blank is a power house. their daughter molly is an up and coming and already excellent filmmaker to to be friends with marty is like winning the trifecta, frankly. marty, you're a lucky man as well as a special friend. now, josh kauffman has been, as he said, a personal friend and our attorney for 30 years. a founding member of the board. he has gotten me out of trouble more than one but more importantly he's kept me from getting into trouble which is actually more important. what was the most recent one was david guggenheim of the disgraceful documentary waiting for superman. josh, i hope we'll be friends we'll have more years. sandy welch is a leader of learning matters. she has steered us through some incredibly tough times. she took over as board chair when our founding chair judge william mcnulty when -- sorry. lost a battle with cancer. and then, of course, she inherited that job just as the worse recession since the depression yet and we're not through that part yet but sandy y
day in the big city. i'm russ mitchell. >> i'm rebecca jarvis. from the jobs to the royals and the shuttle launch and to betty ford. >> a courageous first lady who battled addiction to pain killers and addiction to alcohol and defeating breast cancer. she died in palm springs, california, she was 93 years old. scott pelley takes a look back at her remarkable life. >> reporter: relatively unknown until her husband became president, betty ford became one of the most popular and respected women in america. born elizabeth anne bloomer april 18th, 1918, she grew up in grand rapids, michigan. she dreamed of becoming a professional dancer and after high school she moved east to study under martha graham, the high priestess of modern dance. she earned a spot in the auxiliary dance troupe but her mother pressured her to leave the troupe in 1941. she performed in her own dance troupe, married and divorced and then met a young man named gerald ford, they married in 1948, weeks before ford was elected to his first term in congress. through the 1950s and '60s, they were a traditional an
. >> reporter: but house speaker john boehner claims his debt limit plan has been revived after a big last-minute fix. republicans reworked the package and now it's projected to cut more. $917 billion over ten years. >> it is a test. this is a big step trying to get control of our deficit and our debt. >> reporter: in an interview with brian williams for sunday special "taking the hill, inside congress" boehner played down the loud opposition from some of his own members. >> mr. speaker, is it fair to say that you have a bit of a rebellion on your hands or do you feel -- >> i have a little bit of rebellion on my hands every day. it comes with the territory. >> you don't worry? >> never let them see you sweat. >> reporter: the speaker is getting heat from democrats too. more than 50 just signed a letter saying they would block his plan because it would force us once again to face the threat of default in five or six short months. majority leader harry reid wants to kill the boehner bill and replace it with his own. >> i'm disappointed. i care about john boehner. i think he's a good person.
or you know, too big government. because there's plenty that needs to be done in this country. we need to fix schools. we need to fix sewers at water systems. we need to hire more healthcare workers and child care workers. and that's exactly what wee we should do. this is back -- >> we need to build highways, tunnels. look at traffic you've got to go to in chicago just to get to the show. representative, thanks for your time tonight. have a great weekend. >> thank you, al. >>> up next, michele bachmann takes another big step to the right. and falls off the deep end. is she taking her campaign down with her? >>> and the party of the rich is having some money problems. stay with us. [ male announcer ] this is america. what makes our country great? our can-do spirit and our can-do cheese. kraft singles. this cheese rolls up its sleeves and gets the job done 'cause we're always made with milk and we're rich in calcium to help build 'em up strong! and fast! is is salonpas. >>> welcome back to the show. now to discuss some of the big political stories. with we have the power panel. joining m
state constitutions, and virginia is the big exception to this because they're the ones, as john just pointed out, established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these state constitutions, though, and, you know, i don't have a political axe to grind on this question, but it does fascinate me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious, christian if not protestant qualifications for holding office. so you have pennsylvania, for example. the most radical, democratic constitution of them all. in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the divine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 -- as a historian at least, right? 1776 constitution of the independent state of vermont, you know, today this bastion of kind of secular liberalism upholds the idea that, you know, all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of -- divine inspiration of the old and new testaments, obey the soundness and be a protestant. so you've
. rupert murdoch says he runs a big company and couldn't be expected to know the details of illegal conduct at one london tabloid or precisely how it was covered up. the chief executive of news corp. went out of his way to down play his influence. >> sometimes i would say to keep in touch. i edit "the sunday times" nearly every saturday, not to influence what he has to say at all. >> perhaps the most penetrating question came from a member of parliament who wanted to know just where does the buck stop? >> do you accept responsibility for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you're not responsible. who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> the hearing was carried live by all three cable news networks, including murdoch's fox news and made headlines here and around the world. >>> 80-year-old global power broker rupert murdoch called this the most humble day of his life. we watched him called to account in front of british parliament for the scandal that outraged the world. >> rupert murdoch called it the most humbling day of his life and he
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)